CONNECTED BUT ISOLATED: AN EXPLORATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL MEDIA AND ADOLESCENT BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

Authors

  • Samuel Pernalete Research Scholars Program , Harvard Student Agencies, In collaboration with Learn with Leaders

Keywords:

Social media, mental health, bullying, self-esteem, anxiety, depression

Abstract

This study investigates the link between teenage mental health outcomes and social media use. The paper analyzes earlier studies on the topic, discussing the relationship between social media use, self-esteem, anxiety, and depression. The study also highlights variables such as pre-existing mental health conditions, individual variation in social media use, and the type of platform used that may modify the association between social media use and behavioral health outcomes. The study finds that, depending on individual characteristics and behaviors, social media use can have both beneficial and detrimental consequences on adolescent behavioral health. The study underlines the significance of striking a balance between social media use and other activities to support teenagers' behavioral health.

References

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Additional Files

Published

15-05-2023

How to Cite

Samuel Pernalete. (2023). CONNECTED BUT ISOLATED: AN EXPLORATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL MEDIA AND ADOLESCENT BEHAVIORAL HEALTH. International Education and Research Journal (IERJ), 9(5). Retrieved from https://ierj.in/journal/index.php/ierj/article/view/2708