MEASURING THE PSYCHIATRIC SPACE OF THE EUROPEAN LUNATICS IN COLONIAL INDIA THROUGH THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF OWEN BERKELEY HILL

Sarda Singh

Abstract


The work will use the autobiography of the Superintendent of the European madhouse at Ranchi to delve into the case histories of his patients and to bring to notice how the management and treatment of the lunatics depended on the Superintendent’s style of managing the psychiatric space. How and why did his role become essential in the running of the asylum, the paper’s focus is to understand the Superintendent as the essential figure of the asylum with his diverse approaches towards the malady of the patients. With the state of the asylum depending on the style of management and maintenance from its supervisor, the authority of the Superintendent played an important role in reordering the life of lunatics in the asylum.


Keywords


Psychiatric Spaces, European Lunatics, Autobiography, Lunatic Asylum, Colonial India and Berkeley Hill.

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References


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