PREVALENCE AND ADAPTIVE COPING BEHAVIOUR OF PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME AMONG ADOLESCENT GIRLS

Authors

  • Dr. (Prof) Sudha A. Raddi Dean, Faculty of Nursing, KAHER Institute of Nursing sciences, Belagavi
  • Mrs. Shubharani S. Muragod Asst. Professor, Dept Of OBG Nursing, KAHER Institute of Nursing Sciences, Belagavi
  • Ms Sumedha Raikar 3rd Year P.B. BSc (N), IGNOU Study Centre-1326P, KAHER Institute of Nursing Sciences, Belagavi
  • Mrs Gail Antao Carvalho 3rd Year P.B. BSc (N), IGNOU Study Centre-1326P, KAHER Institute of Nursing Sciences, Belagavi

Keywords:

Premenstrual syndrome, adolescent girls, prevalence, adaptive coping behavior

Abstract

Introduction: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a set of physical, emotional and behavioral symptoms that start week prior to menstruation and subsides when the menstrual flow begins.

Materials and Methods: A quantitative research approach with descriptive cross sectional design was used for 150 B.Sc Nursing students in the age group of 18 to 20 years. The sample was drawn through purposive sampling method. Premenstrual rating scale and check list was use to collect the data. Data was analyzed by using descriptive and infertial statistics.

Results:  Among 150 students 58 (38.7%) had not experienced any symptoms of PMS, about 51 (33.5%) had mild symptoms, 30(20.4%)were having moderate premenstrual symptoms, 11(7.3 %) had severe premenstrual symptoms. Among 150 students Rest124 (82.66%) was the most common coping mechanism for the somatic symptoms followed by reduced caffeine intake54 (36%), exercise 31(20.66%) and analgesic 30 (20%). There was no association found between prevalence of PMS and selected demographic variables.

References

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III. SarkarA.P, Mandal R, Ghorai S. Premanstrual syndrome among adolescent girl students in a rural school of West Bengal, India. International journal of Medical Sciences and Public Health 2016;5(3):408-11.

IV. Taghizadeh Z, Shirmohammadi M, Arbabi M, Mehran A, The Effect of Premenstrual Syndrome on Quality of Life in Adolescent Girls: Iran J Psychiatry 2008; 3:105-109

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VIII. ACOG Practice Bulletin. Premenstrual syndrome. Clinical management guidelines for obstetrician – gynecologists. Number 15. J Obstet Gynecol. 2001;73:183–191

Additional Files

Published

15-01-2020

How to Cite

Dr. (Prof) Sudha A. Raddi, Mrs. Shubharani S. Muragod, Ms Sumedha Raikar, & Mrs Gail Antao Carvalho. (2020). PREVALENCE AND ADAPTIVE COPING BEHAVIOUR OF PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME AMONG ADOLESCENT GIRLS. International Education and Research Journal (IERJ), 6(1). Retrieved from https://ierj.in/journal/index.php/ierj/article/view/1934

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