COMPARISON OF SPINAL ANESTHESIA WITH TOTAL INTRAVENOUS ANESTHESIA DURING OPERATIVE HYSTEROSCOPY

Simin Atashkhoei, Eissa bilehjani, Mehdi Nazari, Solmaz Fakhari

Abstract


Background & Objective: Hysteroscopy is an appropriate method for diagnosis and treatment of intrauterine pathologies. Hysteroscopy can be done under variant anesthetic methods and each one has particular complications. The aim of this study was comparing spinal anesthesia (SA) with total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) during operative hysteroscopy and discusses about each advantages and disadvantages.

Materials and Methods: This study has been performed by randomized clinical trial on candidate patients for operative hysteroscopy between June 2014 and April 2015 in Al-Ahram Hospital. During the study, 76 patients were studied in two groups, SA (study group, n=38) and TIVA (control group, n=38). The results were analyzed by SPSS version16.

Results: Complications during anesthesia, incidence of post-operativepain, recovery time and irrigation fluid volume in the study group were significantly lower than control group within. Time of operation, anesthesia, and patient's satisfaction in two groups were unremarkable. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured higher in study group.

Conclusion:SI had significantly more advantages and lower complications in comparison with TIVA during operative hysteroscopy. 

Background & Objective: Hysteroscopy is an appropriate method for diagnosis and treatment of intrauterine pathologies. Hysteroscopy can be done under variant anesthetic methods and each one has particular complications. The aim of this study was comparing spinal anesthesia (SA) with total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) during operative hysteroscopy and discusses about each advantages and disadvantages.

Materials and Methods: This study has been performed by randomized clinical trial on candidate patients for operative hysteroscopy between June 2014 and April 2015 in Al-Ahram Hospital. During the study, 76 patients were studied in two groups, SA (study group, n=38) and TIVA (control group, n=38). The results were analyzed by SPSS version16.

Results: Complications during anesthesia, incidence of post-operativepain, recovery time and irrigation fluid volume in the study group were significantly lower than control group within. Time of operation, anesthesia, and patient's satisfaction in two groups were unremarkable. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured higher in study group.

Conclusion:SI had significantly more advantages and lower complications in comparison with TIVA during operative hysteroscopy. 


Keywords


operative hysteroscopy, spinal anesthesia, total intravenous anesthesia

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