KASHMIR'S CONTACT WITH CENTRAL ASIA DURING MUGHAL PERIOD (1586-1753.A.D)

Dr Syed Damsaz Ali Andrabi, Dr Mohd Yousuf Bhat

Abstract


The Mughal occupation of Kashmir on 1586,opened new ways of developments. Immediately after its annexation it was merged with Subha Kabul of Mughals. A new type of administration was introduced comprised of subedars, diwans, qazis etc. With the end of political isolation the valley was thrown open to rest of the world,which in turn developed the economy of people. Road communications resulted in multiple of changes. Complete freedom and liberal patronage was provided by rulers to skilled workers for the development of industries. The two progressive industries of the time were Shawl and Silk weaving. Newer designs in the art and architecture were introduced for the first time in valley. Plantation of Chinars was boosted by them. Gardens with attractive terraces were built at different places. The people from far off areas were attracted to valley to see the beautiful tourist spots. Contacts with other areas resulted in cultural changes. Forced labour was abolished and people began to work with interest. All people were satisfied with the new governing class. Different castes of Central Asian origin got settled in valley.

Keywords


Economy,Education, Development, New art, Contacts, Industry etc.

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References


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According to M.Dauvergne the history of Kashmiri Shawls dates back to the times of emperor Babur.The Mughal emperors wore on their turbans a jeweled ornament known as Jigha.Many Andijani weavers were brought into India and Kashmir by the Mughal emperors, because they were the trained masters of the Jigha design. The Jigha design is still prevalent both in Kashmir and Persia. This design was introduced during the time of Mughals both in Kashmir as well as in India.

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Baradari having twelve doors is ordinarily a square or rectangular pavilion with three doorways on each of its four sides. It is generally a summer house in garden.

Achabal is almost 10 Kms. from Anantnag town.

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