EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF STUDENT TEACHERS IN RELATION TO SEX, LOCALITY AND MARITAL STATUS

Dr. Sharmista

Abstract


Our emotions play a significant role in directing and shaping our behavior and personality whatever they may be, the form, frequency and intensity of our emotional experience these can be late categorized into two heads – positive emotions (like affection, amusement, curiosity, joy etc) and negative emotions (like fear, anger, jealously etc). However, the development of both positive as well as negative emotions and the learning of their depression in a reasonable way is quite essential for our own and social well being. However, a person is expected to show a reasonably emotional matured behavior after passing through the period of adolescence. The goal of one’s emotional development is thus to attain emotional maturity in his behavior by demonstrating possession of all types of emotions – positive and negative and their experience in a reasonable amount at the right time in the proper way.A new concept ‘emotional intelligence’  with its significance even more than one’s general intelligence has emerged on the educational scene. It may be defined as one’s unitary ability to know, feel and judge emotions in co-operation with a person’s thinking process for behaving in a proper way, with the ultimate realization of happiness in himself and in others.One of the dimensions of personal experience is the emotional or affective dimension. Emotional process is not an isolated phenomenon but component of general experience, constantly influencing and influenced by other processes going on at the same time. Emotions are personal experiences that arise from complex interplay among physiological, cognitive and situational variables. Emotions if properly used are an essential tool for successful and fulfilling life. But if emotions are out of control, it can result in a disaster. In day-to-day life, they affect our relations with other people, our self-identity and our ability to complete a task. To be effective, our cognitive processes must be in control of our emotions, so that they work for us rather than against us. 

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