REMINISCENCES OF A FORGOTTEN FIGHTER: THE BOUNDLESS BEGUM HAZRAT MAHAL

Authors

  • Ms. Komal Sharma Ph.D Scholar, Political Science, Himachal Pradesh University

Keywords:

Patronage, Seopoy, Mutiy, Recalcitrate, Proclamation, Recreant, Reminiscence

Abstract

The hard won Indian freedom of 1947 was a consequence of sacrifices made by valorous men and women who kept their motherland beyond everything. To free one’s land from the clutches of treacherous alien rulers, the First War of Independence was fought in 1857. It was the first time when people dared to raise their voice against the brutal British rule. Many historians and scholars have come up with extensive writings on the uprising of 1857 and glorified various freedom fighters for their valiance.But, due to numerous reasons many leaders were kept far away from any limelight or glory, so this paper is an attempt to highlight the brave efforts of a woman who was abandoned by her own husband Nawab Wajid Ali Shah of Awadh.Despite  unfavourable situations by her side, destiny took her to a juncture of life where she was re-entitled  as begum and was popularized as the leader of people and an excellent administrator.She led the revolt in Awadh with all her abilities and proved to be a worthy figure.Though, the uprising did not reach its required end, yet it became historic and encouraged leaders of future to fight for the freedom of beloved country.

References

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Additional Files

Published

15-05-2023

How to Cite

Ms. Komal Sharma. (2023). REMINISCENCES OF A FORGOTTEN FIGHTER: THE BOUNDLESS BEGUM HAZRAT MAHAL. International Education and Research Journal (IERJ), 9(5). Retrieved from http://ierj.in/journal/index.php/ierj/article/view/2743