HOW DO ENVIRONMENTAL DIMENSIONS WITHIN A FAMILY ENVIRONMENT FUNCTION AS PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS TO INFLUENCE PSYCHOLOGICAL RESILIENCE?

Authors

  • AVANTIKA RAJAN Research Scholars Program, Harvard Student Agencies, In collaboration with Learn with Leaders

Keywords:

Resilience, Family Environment, Acceptance & Caring, Cohesion

Abstract

This study aims to investigate how environmental dimensions - especially acceptance and caring within a family environment - function as protective mechanisms to influence psychological resilience. Psychological resilience is the ability to adapt and bounce back from adversity. Protective mechanisms can help individuals overcome challenges and build resilience. Through a systematic review of existing literature and analysis of case studies, this study identified that a family environment characterized by acceptance and caring can positively impact psychological resilience. Specifically, cohesion, acceptance, and caring were identified as important protective mechanisms within the family environment. These findings have important implications for individuals, families, and mental health professionals, highlighting the importance of environmental dimensions that can influence psychological resilience.

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Additional Files

Published

15-05-2023

How to Cite

AVANTIKA RAJAN. (2023). HOW DO ENVIRONMENTAL DIMENSIONS WITHIN A FAMILY ENVIRONMENT FUNCTION AS PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS TO INFLUENCE PSYCHOLOGICAL RESILIENCE? . International Education and Research Journal (IERJ), 9(5). Retrieved from http://ierj.in/journal/index.php/ierj/article/view/2723