AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM THE NASAL AND HAND SWABS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

Authors

  • Mohd Saleem Assistant Professor, Sub-Division Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Hail, Hail, KSA
  • Shahid.M.A. Lecturer, Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, University of Hail, Hail, KSA
  • Abdulmohshen Saad Alghassab MBBS 4th Year, College of Medicine, University of Hail, Hail, KSA
  • Yousef Ateeg Awad ALsadi MBBS 4th Year, College of Medicine, University of Hail, Hail, KSA
  • Yossef fahad khaled AL-aslami MBBS 4th Year, College of Medicine, University of Hail, Hail, KSA
  • Naser Sultan Meshal Alshammry MBBS 4th Year, College of Medicine, University of Hail, Hail, KSA
  • Saud Abdulaziz Alhuwayfi MBBS 4th Year, College of Medicine, University of Hail, Hail, KSA
  • Abdulsalam Eisa Alshammari MBBS 4th Year, College of Medicine, University of Hail, Hail, KSA

Keywords:

Medical Students, Bacterial Isolates, Hand and Nasal Swabs

Abstract

Objective: To study the bacterial isolates from the nasal and hand swabs of medical students.

 

Methods: This a cross-sectional study conducted among the 4th and 6th year MBBS students. A total of 18 students (9 each from students from 4th and 6th year) were included in the study. The hand and nasal swabs were collected through standard methods.

 

Results: Overall, Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent organism in hand swab among the 4th (44.4%) and 6th (55.5%) year medical students. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the second most common isolate in hand swab accounting for 33.3% each in 4th and 6th year students, however, difference was statistically insignificant (p>0.05). MRSA (50%) in nasal swab contributed among half of the medical students being insignificantly (p>0.05) higher in 4th year students (55.6%) compared to 6th year (44.4%). The percentage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in hand swab was higher among the students of Pediatrics ward than other wards, each accounted 66.7%. The percentage of Gram positive in hand swab of students was 42.4% and 57.6% in nasal swab. However, the percentage of Gram positive in hand swab of ward was 38.7% and 52.6% in nasal swab.

 

Conclusion: Medical students have higher rates of hand and nasal organism rates. The medical students have the potential to transmit the infection to the patients during their hospital stay.

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Additional Files

Published

15-05-2016

How to Cite

Mohd Saleem, Shahid.M.A., Abdulmohshen Saad Alghassab, Yousef Ateeg Awad ALsadi, Yossef fahad khaled AL-aslami, Naser Sultan Meshal Alshammry, Saud Abdulaziz Alhuwayfi, & Abdulsalam Eisa Alshammari. (2016). AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM THE NASAL AND HAND SWABS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY . International Education and Research Journal (IERJ), 2(5). Retrieved from http://ierj.in/journal/index.php/ierj/article/view/260