REVIEWING THE ‘REVISED ICT@SCHOOL’ POLICY IN INDIA: UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES ON EDUCATIONAL ECO-SYSTEMS

Panchalee Tamulee

Abstract


Drawing the importance of technology in 21st Century, India re-launched the ICT@School Scheme in 2010 to formalise computer education among government schools. However, this giant step in introducing and institutionalising digital education in India should not be seen in isolation from the larger political scenario. The article elaborates on how international and country politics influenced the formulation of this scheme. Further, the article explains how the scheme opened doors for new public management into Indian education system and thereby explaining unintentionally interruption in the existing eco-system at both micro (school) and meta (educational governance system) levels. It concludes with the call for an appropriate and context specified partnership for governance and implementation of holistic education including digital technology.


Keywords


Education technology, new public management, governance, India, government schools

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