INNOVATIVE AND BEST PRACTICES IN TEACHING, LEARNING

Dr. Sunita B. Jadhav

Abstract


Education is a light that shows the mankind the right direction to surge. The purpose of education is not just making a student literate but adds rationale thinking, knowledge and self sufficiency. In order to improve and to maintain the quality of higher education NAAC has made it obligatory to establish a strong and empowered IQAC cell in every educational institution. Teaching, learning and evaluation process of the institution is one of the most important criterions among the seven criterions to serve as the basis for assessment of colleges. These three components are important pillars of education on which building of the future is to be constructed to touch the new heights. As it is said that there is no teaching unless there is learning, teacher uses variety of methods to make the concept more comprehensible. Any communication methods that serve this purpose without destroying the objective could be considered as innovative methods of teaching. The use of innovative methods in educational institutions has the potential not only to improve education, but also to develop creativity, empower people, strengthen governance and galvanize the effort to achieve the human development goal for the country. The purpose of this paper is to suggest useful innovative teaching, learning and evaluation methods that can be attempted in imparting knowledge to the students.

Keywords


NAAC, IQAC, Innovative, Best Practices, Teaching-Learning.

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References


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