MENSTRUAL HYGIENE PRACTICES AND ITS ASSOCIATION WITH MENSTRUAL PROBLEM AND REPRODUCTIVE TRACT INFECTION AMONG WOMEN IN MAHARASHTRA: RESULTS FROM A DISTRICT LEVEL HOUSEHOLD SURVEY

Tejaswi Raste, Prashika Kurlikar, Savita Raste

Abstract


Inadequate Menstrual hygiene management among women is a public health problem in India. Women in Maharashtra face barriers to achieving adequate menstrual hygiene. Hence, the papers focus on the variation in the menstrual hygiene practices and its association with RTI among women in Maharashtra. District Level Household and Facility Survey data (DLHS 3 & 4 India) use in the present study. Bivariate and logistic techniques conducted using IBM SPSS statistics 20. Results show that factors such as, age, educational status, work status, and residence determined for proper menstrual hygiene practices. The study result shows association between unclean old clothes and RTIs among women in Maharashtra. The high prevalence of RTIs and poor menstrual hygiene, suggest scope for intervention through health education programmed among women. The consequences are invisible health concerns that need to be addressed immediately in the form of health education aimed at women.

Keywords


Menstrual hygiene, Practices, Restriction, Reproductive tract infection, Women, Maharashtra.

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