VALUE EDUCATION A CONTINIOUS PROCESS FOR SOCIAL RESILIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY: A STUDY ON 11TH GRADE STUDENTS IN NADIA DISTRICT, WEST BENGAL, INDIA

Deepanjana Khan

Abstract


Values are part and parcel of the philosophy of a nation and its educational system. The modern materialistic world raises our standard of living but declines the values of our life. The erosion of value from human life leads pupil towards low and dark dimensions of his consciousness. In recent decades the basic environment in which children expense major developmental changes has suddenly shifted from a natural to an urban one. Lacking contact with the nature damages learners’ free thinking. Value education makes a very important strong positive relationship, positive dispositions to learning, capacity for reflection, self management and self knowledge towards environment. Inculcation of value education for sustainability concerns whole system thinking, which is a framework for seeing the whole picture, for establishing interrelationship and understanding phenomena as an integrated whole. It provides an opportunity to explore novel approaches that reintegrates knowledge and that transcendent the traditional boundaries in a unique one. Values and responsibilities are some important aspects of these relationships. The value-belief-norm aspects aim to create a conceptual framework of environmentally significant behaviour. Development of environmental value for social resilience and environmental sustainability is a continuous process. It explores the possibility to regenerate environmental value for social resilience and environmental sustainability.


Keywords


Environmental Education, environmental value, sustainability, social resilience

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References


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